Peddling Prosperity

I have been accused of having a man-crush on Paul Krugman.  So sue me.  He just writes so darned clearly.

I backtracked chronologically to read Peddling Prosperity because I wanted to understand the differences amongst Keynesians, Monetarists, Supply-Siders and others.  Check.  This book was written at the beginning of the first Clinton administration and […]

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Reinventing the Bazaar: A Natural History of Markets

Don’t judge this book by its cover (or by its title for that matter).  I picked this book from an old summer reading list from Greg Mankiw (still searching for the best criteria for selection of economics books) without seeing the cover, thank goodness.  Reinventing the Bazaar:  A Natural History of Markets, by John McMillan […]

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Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future

I picked Robert B. Reich’s Aftershock because lately I’ve been wanting to read Reich and because I thought it might make a good follow-up to Krugman’s Depression Economics.  This time the criteria were good.  The book explains The Great Depression, The Great Prosperity (1947-1975), the bad years since 1975, the recent Global Financial Crisis, and […]

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Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy…

Animal Spirits was written by two well-known economists (George Akerlof and Robert J. Shiller), with many well-regarded books to their names.  It’s about a fascinating subject:  behavioral economics and how human psychology affects market decisions.  It received many impressive blurbs for its book jacket.   The subject is very intriguing, it dove-tails nicely with many of […]

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Economics in One Lesson: The Shortest and Surest Way to Understand Basic Economics

Henry Hazlitt’s Economics in One Lesson was also recommended by an economics instructor, I think as a counter-balance to the Keynesians I’d been reading.  The book was originally written in 1946, and the version I read was updated in 1978.   Even with the ’78 revision,  I felt like I was in a town hall or […]

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