The Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World

I picked this next economics book based on Amazon reviews and the fact that the author writes for The Economist.  Turns out my selection criteria were ineffective.  Greg Ip’s The Little Book of Economics is little:  just 250 pages, lots of white space, lots of excerpts duplicated in highlight boxes and a little book, physically.  […]

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The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008

After Naked Economics, I asked my economics instructors and my economics-savvy friends for some more book recommendations.  Paul Krugman’s Depression Economics made all their lists (although several of them told me that they did not agree with his politics).   So now I’m a Paul Krugman fan.  His writing style (in both the book and in […]

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Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science

Several chapters from Charles Wheelan’s Naked Economics were required reading for a Pol/Econ class I took at work right before we left for Tel Aviv.  Our economics professor recommended we read the whole book if we had time.  I had time.  I thoroughly enjoyed the book.  Wheelan‘s goal was to write a book on […]

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Summer One-liners

Since I haven’t taken the time to write even brief reviews of the books I’ve read over the last several months,  here’s a list of them in roughly the order they were read.  As, or if, reviews are added, they will link from this page.

Shut Up, I’m Talking – Gregory Levey.   Very funny memoir […]

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The World Is Flat

Our book club is discussing Thomas Friedman’s The World Is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century (TWIF) this month.  I read the 2005 edition of the book, so I’m not sure about the contents of the 2.0 and 3.0 updates.  The first half of the book describes ten “flatteners” that have […]

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